Monthly Archives: June, 2009

How does sugar cane grow?

Much of the sugar we eat comes from the sugary juices of the sugar cane plant which grows in Hawaii, Puerto Rico and other warm, moist lands. Sugar  cane is really a giant grass that looks much like corn. To grow sugar cane, workers plant short pieces of the stalk in the ground and cover …

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How were the mountain made?

Some high mountains are volcanoes.  Others were made in other ways.  Mountains are created by violent changes in the earth’s surface.  Deep under the earth great forces lift, wrinkle, and more that rocks that make up the earth’s crust. Huge blocks of rocks are pushed, tilted, raised or squeezed into great folds, much like a …

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What makes the holes in swiss cheese?

Swiss cheese is a cheese with many large holes.  The holes are made by bacteria. To make Swiss cheese, the cheese maker begins by adding special bacteria to fresh milk. This is not the kind of bacteria that makes you sick.  These are safe bacteria. These cause the milk to sour, and this is known …

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What causes rain?

You know rain falls from clouds.  Have you ever wondered how raindrops happen to be in clouds? Moisture is constantly evaporated from the earth’s surface by the warmth of the sun.  the invisible water vapor is carried upward by currents of warm, rising air.  As the moisture-loaded air rises it cools. As the air cools, …

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How does banana grows?

Banana grow on tall stalks that look much like palm trees.  People in nearly every land like bananas.  They grow on tall plants that are often called trees.   They  are not real trees because they do not have a woody trunk like a tree.  Instead, the stalk is made up of long leaves wrapped tightly …

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What are the Roman Numerals?

The ancient Romans used numerals that look like letters.  To write any number they had to use the letters I, V, X, L, C, D and M.  The numbers 1,2,3 were written, I, II, III.  Number 4 was written IV, or d (V) minus I, number 6 was VI, or 5 plus one, and so …

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What keeps the sun shining and how long can it continue to do so?

The Sun is a huge ball of extremely hot, glowing gases.  It is considered as the star nearest to the Earth.  It’s mass is equivalent to 333,420 earth. The surface temperature of the sun is estimated to be between 5 000 oC to 6 000 oC.  Temperature at the core is as high as 14 …

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Why don’t ancient mummies decay?

Ancient mummies do not decay because they have been preserved.  The name “mummy” came about because the ones and skins of corpses embalmed (preserved) by the ancient Egyptians were found to be blackened.  The blackened corpses were mistakenly credited to the use of “bitumen” (mumiya in Arabic) in the embalming process. In the Philippines, a …

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What is locoweed?

The dreaded locoweed is a poisonous plant of the western United States.  Locoweed gets its name from the Spanish word for “crazy” because cattle, horses and sheep that eat this dangerous plant act in a strange, drunken manner and often die.  Locoweed is named for the color of its flowers, which resemble those of peas …

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